WHAT: Free & Confidential HIV/STI Testing

WHERE: Winston-Salem Urban League Event Center (510 N Trade St)

WHEN: Every Tuesday from 1-2:30pm

What is POSSE?

POSSE (Prevent Ongoing Spread of STIs Everywhere) is a program of the HIV & STI (Sexually Transmitted Infection) Outreach Section at the Forsyth County Department of Public Health. POSSE is a convenient option for all; especially persons uncomfortable talking to their healthcare provider or doctor – or unable to afford one. Testing is confidential and free!

Results for all tests are available approximately 3 weeks after your testing date. You can call 336-703-3212 or 336-703-3213 to receive your test results on Mondays and Wednesdays from 3:30 pm – 4:30 pm. You can also receive a paper copy of your results by coming to the Health Department during regular business hours. You will be required to show a photo ID to receive results.

Available Tests

  • HIV (rapid test)
    • Mouth Swab — An easy and painless way to test for HIV using a mouth swab
    • Finger Stick – An easy way to test for HIV, used in place of or in addition to the standard blood test
  • HIV, Syphilis, and Hepatitis B & C
    • One simple blood draw that can be tested for HIV, Syphilis, and Hepatitis B & C
  • Gonorrhea & Chlamydia
    • Women: A painless vaginal swab (collected by the individual) is collected for testing
    • Men: A small urine sample (collected by the individual) is collected for testing. (If you know you want to have this test done, please be prepared to provide a urine sample when you arrive)
    • As needed, a painless rectal and/or pharyngeal swab will be used to collect an appropriate sample for testing

Why get tested?

Do you know your status?

Many sexually transmitted infections are easily curable and the only way to know if you have one is to get tested. STIs are common, but taking the appropriate precautions can help keep you safe in the future. 

STD testing can be quick, easy, and painless! There’s no reason to put it off any longer!

You should get tested if:

  • You’re pregnant
  • You’ve had unprotected sex or have shared drug injection materials (recommended testing at least once a year)
  • You are sexually active with new or multiple sex partners, or a sex partner who has an STI
  • You were born between 1945 and 1965 (testing for Hepatitis C)

North Carolina Statistics:

HIV

  • As of December 31, 2017, 1,670 people residing in Forsyth County have been diagnosed with HIV. 722 have been diagnosed with AIDS.
  • As of December 31, 2017, the number of people living with HIV who reside in North Carolina (including those initially diagnosed in another state) was 35,045.
  • In 2017, 1,310 new HIV diagnoses were reported among the adult and adolescent (over 13 years old) population, a rate of 15.2 per 100,000 population. This rate is a slight decrease from 2016, where 1,399 adults and adolescents were newly diagnosed with HIV (rate =16.4 per 100,000).
  • People between 20 and 29 years old had the highest rates of newly diagnosed HIV in 2017, comprising 41.0% of the newly diagnosed population.
  • Among race/ethnicity and gender groups, Black/African Americans represented 64.8% of all adult/adolescent infections, with a rate of 45.5 per 100,000 adult/adolescent population.
  • The highest rate (78.0 per 100,000) was among adult/adolescent Black/African American men who also account for 64.5% of newly diagnosed cases.

Syphilis

  • There were 23 infants reported with probable congenital syphilis in 2017. This number is an increase from the 18 congenital syphilis cases reported in 2016.
  • The highest rates of newly diagnosed early syphilis occurred in people between 20 to 24 years old (rate of 53.5 per 100,000) and 25 to 29 years old (58.7 per 100,000). Cases in these age groups comprised 43.0% of the total early syphilis cases in 2017.
  • Black/African American men had the highest rates of early syphilis (88.3 per 100,000) and accounted for 50.9% of total early syphilis cases in 2017.

Gonorrhea 

  • The reported number of gonorrhea cases in 2017 was 22,694, a rate of 220.9 per 100,000 population, an increase from 19,726 cases in 2016 (rate of 194.2 per 100,000).
  • In 2017, Black/African American men and women had the highest gonorrhea rates (556.1 and 419.6 per 100,000, respectively) and accounted for 48.4% of total gonorrhea cases.
  • Among women reported with gonorrhea, the highest rates occurred in 20 to 24-year-olds, followed by 25 to 29-year-olds, and 15 to 19-year-olds (1,024.3, 689.9, and 620.9 per 100,000, respectively). The 15 to 29-year-olds comprised 71.7% of the total reported gonorrhea cases in 2017.

Chlamydia

  • The number of chlamydia cases diagnosed in North Carolina in 2017 was 62,893, a rate of 612.2 per 100,000 population, an increase from 58,078 cases in 2016 (rate of 571.8 per 100,000 population).
  • Among women reported with chlamydia, the highest rates occurred in 20 to 24-year-olds, followed by 15 to 19-year-olds, and 25 to 29-year-olds (5,035.1, 4,315.2, and 1,963.8 per 100,000, respectively). Overall, the 15 to 29-year-olds comprised 85.0% of the total chlamydia cases in 2017.
  • In 2017, Black/African American men and women had the highest chlamydia rates (661.9 and 1,239.2 per 100,000, respectively) and accounted for 35.0% of the total chlamydia cases.

Hepatitis B

  • The number of acute hepatitis B cases diagnosed in North Carolina in 2017 was 185, a rate of 1.8 per 100,000 population, an increase from 169 cases in 2016 (1.7 per 100,000 population).
  • The highest rates of newly diagnosed acute hepatitis B occurred among the 35 to 44-year-old age group. This age group comprised 35.2% of the total acute hepatitis B cases.
  • In 2017, White/Caucasian men and women had the highest acute hepatitis B rates (2.4 and 1.6 per 100,000, respectively) and comprised 70.3% of the total acute hepatitis B cases.
  • In 2017, the exposure most frequently reported by people with acute hepatitis B was heterosexual contact (50.8%), followed by IDU (33.0%).
  • The number of newly diagnosed chronic hepatitis B cases in North Carolina in 2017 was 1,147 at a rate of 11.2 per 100,000. The majority of cases were among men (rate of 13.9 per 100,000), the 35-39 age group (rate of 27.7 per 100,000), and Asian/Pacific Islander (rate of 81.9 per 100,000).
  • As of December 31, 2017, there were 23,370 people diagnosed with chronic hepatitis B, who were presumed to be living in North Carolina.

Hepatitis C

  • The highest rates of newly diagnosed acute hepatitis C occurred among the 20 to 39-year-old age group. This age group comprised 51.6% of the total acute hepatitis C cases.
  • In 2017, White/Caucasian men and women had the highest acute hepatitis C rates (2.3 and 2.2 per 100,000, respectively) and comprised 78.5% of the total acute hepatitis C cases.
  • In 2017, the most frequently reported risk factor by people with acute hepatitis C was IDU (46.8%), followed by heterosexual contact (44.6%).
  • Between October 2016 (when chronic hepatitis C became a reportable infection) and December 31, 2017, 21,757 chronic hepatitis C cases were newly reported in North Carolina. The majority of cases were among men (59.2%), in both the 25-34 age group (21.3%) and 50-64 age group (41.7%).

Sources:

North Carolina DHHS Communicable Disease 2017 North Carolina HIV/STD/Hepatitis Surveillance Report Summary